MAPS-NOW: Marymoor Park Restoration

mapsnow

06 Apr MAPS-NOW: Marymoor Park Restoration


Event Details


Saturday, April 22, 2017

9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Marymoor Park

6046 West Lake Sammamish Parkway Northeast

Lot K

Redmond, WA 98052

 

Description

MAPS-NOW, in collaboration with King County, has adopted a section of Marymoor Park. We meet 3 times a year to preserve that natural area and make it more suitable for local wildlife.

This is a great opportunity to come with your whole family (all ages are welcome) and enjoy the beautiful nature that Allah (swt) has blessed us. At the same time, contribute back to nature and our community fulfilling one of MAPS goals of Outbound Good. Rain or shine, we will deliver on our promise of restoring this natural area back to it original form.

What to Expect On The day

We will meet on the east side of parking Lot K near field 1, look for our registration table. At 9 AM, King County volunteer will give brief orientation of tools and area that we will work on. Then we will work in small groups till 12 PM. Our project for the day will be to clip back blackberry from a restoration site to give the established diverse native trees & shrubs a better chance to survive and thrive. Gloves, tools, water and light snacks will be provided.

Young people under the age of 16 must be accompanied by an adult. Any minors under the age of 18 attending the event without a parent or legal guardian must also bring a signed Youth Waiver to event in order to participate.

What to Bring

  • Layers of warm clothing that can get dirty. Jeans, thick pants or dress/skirt with leggings underneath is ideal
  • Rain jacket and rain pants (or sun hat and sunblock)
  • Closed –toed shoes are essential. Sturdy sneakers, rain boots or hiking boots are ideal
  • Full water bottle
  • Lunch and snacks

Why your Volunteer Service is Important

Forests and wetlands need to have diversity in order to be healthy and thrive. When forests are thriving, they can provide many benefits to our community like filtering pollution, mitigating erosion and storm damage and providing habitat for wildlife and green spaces where people can connect with nature and the outdoors. Aggressive noxious weeds like English Ivy and Himalayan Blackberry were brought to this area and planted by for their desirable characteristics of staying green all year round or tasty fruits. These plants have upset the balance that our forests need to survive and thrive. Removing these aggressive plants and planting native plants can help restore the balance to a damaged ecosystem.

 

REGISTER